Clicky

X

Subscribe to our newsletter

Get the State of Digital Newsletter
Join an elite group of marketers receiving the best content in their mailbox
* = required field
Daily Updates

Watch out Facebook, here comes the “Kroesade”

2 June 2010 BY

She has a reputation of being the iron lady and many Dutch believe she would be the best choice to become the next Dutch prime minister. But Neelie Kroes believes she has a job to do at the European Commission. And Social Networksites might regret that Kroes didn’t want to become prime minister. She has started her crusade or should we say “Kroesade”.

Where in her last job as euro kartel commissioner Kroes went after companies like Microsoft in her new job she’s after the social networksites like Facebook, Google Buzz and Hyves. Recent developments with Facebook and Buzz must have attracted attention in Brussels.

In a debate in Brussels Kroes was quoted yesterday that she was going to be ‘more tough’ on the networksites in regard to privacy matters. She said this in a discussion on the proposal where sites like Facebook will be forced to put profiles of minors below the age of 12, standard on private.

The EU also wants the sites to be more open about the subject and better warn the users for the risk of sharing personal information.

What would this mean?

Apart from the question how the networksites will have to implement this if it is only allowed in Europe, the big question is, if this becomes reality, what will that do for the popularity of the sites? One of the reasons the sites are this popular is that people can look on other profiles. For some it will convince them to actually start using it.

And isn’t the fact that you can make new friends easily one of the benefits of using a social network? What the sites are essentially doing is making it easier to connect with friends and friends of friends. If a part of that is taken away, where’s the benefit of it? Maybe it won’t be as bad as this because it is only meant for the under 12 year olds, but still, its something to think about.

Being clear

One thing which in my opinion is much more important is being clear about it. So using Facebook means your information is public. That shouldn’t be a problem, as long as you KNOW what you are doing. And as long as you know the risks. Thats where I definitely agree with the proposal. Sites should be much more educating towards their users. Now it feels like the dealer who first gets the junkie hooked and then tells him its bad for him. It should be the other way around.

AUTHORED BY:
h

Bas van den Beld is a speaker, trainer and online marketing strategist. Bas is the founder of Stateofdigital.com. -- You can hire Bas to speak, train or consult.
  • http://www.e-difference.nl/ Jeroen van Eck

    What I find interesting about this is that someone with the power to do something about these issues is actually trying to make some changes. But this means that government will be interfering with the way the web develops. Although it might be in the best interest of the users this time, are we going to allow such involvement? The web is all about freedom, openness and self regulation. Involvement in these kinds of issues by Kroes and the European Commission, although with the best intentions, will take away some of the ‘free’ and ‘open’ from the web.

Nice job, you found it!

Now, go try out the 12th one:

Use Google Translate to bypass a paywall...

Ran into a page you can't read because it is blocked or paywalled? Here's a quick trick (doesn't always work, but often does!):

Type the page into Google translate (replace the example with the page you want):

http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=ja&tl=en&u=http://example.com/

How about that!?

Like this 12th trick? Tell others they need to look for this trick on our page: http://www.stateofdigital.com/search-hacks-marketers/

Or Tweet: Found the secret 12th one!